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DISCLAIMER: This is an artist blog. It is a homage to the artists and the artists material. The images on this blog have been linked from the world wide web. These images are not presented as my own. Copyright still belongs to the owner of the work. There is no comercial use. If you see your work on this blog and wish it to be removed let me know.

DIGITAL DREAMLAND
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red-lipstick:

JR (b. 1983, France) - Times Square, The Last Piece Left from The Inside Out Project, New York City
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giphy:

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: Alec Mackenzie aka BADBLUEPRINTS
What GIF best describes how you are currently feeling?

When did you first start making GIFs? What was your first GIF?

I started a couple of years ago and the first was this animation I put together of a smashed up LCD screen taken from one of those cheap 99-games-in-one handheld consoles where all the games are terrible Tetris clones. I’d made a few prints based on it way back in art school and thought it would be nice to resurrect it in gif form. Things have gone a very different direction since then.
Your GIFs are so fun to look through because they are all so crazy and weird (in an awesome way!). Where do you find inspiration?
I try to entertain myself with what I make now and most of my ideas come from sitting at the computer, listening to music, or when I’m about to go to sleep and I’ll drowsily tap them into my phone for later. That means when I wake up in the morning I’ve got to remember what I’m supposed to be doing with nonsense phrases like ‘boxface’ or ‘hotdog planet’. I also used to work in a dental lab, casting models for dentures and mouth guards, so that’s possibly why I keep putting so many teeth into things….

I’m really most inspired by what other gif artists are making. Not necessarily always in terms of subject matter but the work ethic they have in constantly producing great art, all while carving out their own very distinctive styles and niches.
What kind of a process do you go through to create your art?
I’ve a big collection of models from Sketchup, and I’ll play around with them until something interesting comes up. I’ll then copy and paste the results into GIMP for editing into gifs. It’s fairly low-tech as I previously made them on a little netbook that would groan if you dared have more than two browser tabs open. My computer is a bit better these days but old habits die hard.
What attracts you to the GIF format?

I find it suits an intuitive way of working, like sketching, and there’s something really gratifying about their looping repetitive nature, in the same way that things like old zoetropes and clockwork toys are still fascinating today. Before I started making gifs I was becoming dissatisfied with my art in the studio as I was producing these large-scale geometric wall drawings that required a lot of planning and measuring and not much fun. I saw gifs as a good way to free things back up and start creating work purely for enjoyment again.
Who are a few of your favorite artists?
There are tons but here’s a handful…
kidmographvince mckelvierachel macleanclay roderycindy suenjason clarkejohn mclaughlinbrianbrianbrianbrianbrianbrianjohn karelmironeltons kuns
Current favorite GIF?
When things aren’t going right this is oddly reassuring…

Want more? Check out more GIF art from BADBLUEPRINTS on Giphy.com…and if you have a Mac iOS 10.8 or higher be sure to download the screensaver!
giphy:

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: Alec Mackenzie aka BADBLUEPRINTS
What GIF best describes how you are currently feeling?

When did you first start making GIFs? What was your first GIF?

I started a couple of years ago and the first was this animation I put together of a smashed up LCD screen taken from one of those cheap 99-games-in-one handheld consoles where all the games are terrible Tetris clones. I’d made a few prints based on it way back in art school and thought it would be nice to resurrect it in gif form. Things have gone a very different direction since then.
Your GIFs are so fun to look through because they are all so crazy and weird (in an awesome way!). Where do you find inspiration?
I try to entertain myself with what I make now and most of my ideas come from sitting at the computer, listening to music, or when I’m about to go to sleep and I’ll drowsily tap them into my phone for later. That means when I wake up in the morning I’ve got to remember what I’m supposed to be doing with nonsense phrases like ‘boxface’ or ‘hotdog planet’. I also used to work in a dental lab, casting models for dentures and mouth guards, so that’s possibly why I keep putting so many teeth into things….

I’m really most inspired by what other gif artists are making. Not necessarily always in terms of subject matter but the work ethic they have in constantly producing great art, all while carving out their own very distinctive styles and niches.
What kind of a process do you go through to create your art?
I’ve a big collection of models from Sketchup, and I’ll play around with them until something interesting comes up. I’ll then copy and paste the results into GIMP for editing into gifs. It’s fairly low-tech as I previously made them on a little netbook that would groan if you dared have more than two browser tabs open. My computer is a bit better these days but old habits die hard.
What attracts you to the GIF format?

I find it suits an intuitive way of working, like sketching, and there’s something really gratifying about their looping repetitive nature, in the same way that things like old zoetropes and clockwork toys are still fascinating today. Before I started making gifs I was becoming dissatisfied with my art in the studio as I was producing these large-scale geometric wall drawings that required a lot of planning and measuring and not much fun. I saw gifs as a good way to free things back up and start creating work purely for enjoyment again.
Who are a few of your favorite artists?
There are tons but here’s a handful…
kidmographvince mckelvierachel macleanclay roderycindy suenjason clarkejohn mclaughlinbrianbrianbrianbrianbrianbrianjohn karelmironeltons kuns
Current favorite GIF?
When things aren’t going right this is oddly reassuring…

Want more? Check out more GIF art from BADBLUEPRINTS on Giphy.com…and if you have a Mac iOS 10.8 or higher be sure to download the screensaver!
giphy:

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: Alec Mackenzie aka BADBLUEPRINTS
What GIF best describes how you are currently feeling?

When did you first start making GIFs? What was your first GIF?

I started a couple of years ago and the first was this animation I put together of a smashed up LCD screen taken from one of those cheap 99-games-in-one handheld consoles where all the games are terrible Tetris clones. I’d made a few prints based on it way back in art school and thought it would be nice to resurrect it in gif form. Things have gone a very different direction since then.
Your GIFs are so fun to look through because they are all so crazy and weird (in an awesome way!). Where do you find inspiration?
I try to entertain myself with what I make now and most of my ideas come from sitting at the computer, listening to music, or when I’m about to go to sleep and I’ll drowsily tap them into my phone for later. That means when I wake up in the morning I’ve got to remember what I’m supposed to be doing with nonsense phrases like ‘boxface’ or ‘hotdog planet’. I also used to work in a dental lab, casting models for dentures and mouth guards, so that’s possibly why I keep putting so many teeth into things….

I’m really most inspired by what other gif artists are making. Not necessarily always in terms of subject matter but the work ethic they have in constantly producing great art, all while carving out their own very distinctive styles and niches.
What kind of a process do you go through to create your art?
I’ve a big collection of models from Sketchup, and I’ll play around with them until something interesting comes up. I’ll then copy and paste the results into GIMP for editing into gifs. It’s fairly low-tech as I previously made them on a little netbook that would groan if you dared have more than two browser tabs open. My computer is a bit better these days but old habits die hard.
What attracts you to the GIF format?

I find it suits an intuitive way of working, like sketching, and there’s something really gratifying about their looping repetitive nature, in the same way that things like old zoetropes and clockwork toys are still fascinating today. Before I started making gifs I was becoming dissatisfied with my art in the studio as I was producing these large-scale geometric wall drawings that required a lot of planning and measuring and not much fun. I saw gifs as a good way to free things back up and start creating work purely for enjoyment again.
Who are a few of your favorite artists?
There are tons but here’s a handful…
kidmographvince mckelvierachel macleanclay roderycindy suenjason clarkejohn mclaughlinbrianbrianbrianbrianbrianbrianjohn karelmironeltons kuns
Current favorite GIF?
When things aren’t going right this is oddly reassuring…

Want more? Check out more GIF art from BADBLUEPRINTS on Giphy.com…and if you have a Mac iOS 10.8 or higher be sure to download the screensaver!
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suuperheroes:

Pen Orchestra by benoitchallandWhen pen reveal their true secrets…
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Twisted Signs - Johann Büsen
8.4. - 18.6.2014
 
Seit Jahrhunderten nutzen Künstler die Erfindungen und Techniken ihrer Zeit für die Erstellung ihrer Bildwelten. In der Welt des 21. Jahrhunderts, in der ein Leben und Arbeiten ohne den Computer gleichsam undenkbar ist, erscheint die Verbindung von Kunst und Computer ebenfalls keineswegs fremd. Im Gegenteil! Seit den Anfängen in der Mitte des letzten Jahrhunderts wächst die Zahl der mit dem Computer arbeitenden Künstler, aber auch der Möglichkeiten, Kunst auf digitale Weise zu erschaffen. Seit Jahren ist daher die Digitale Kunst sowohl auf dem Kunstmarkt als auch bei Kunstsammlern en vogue und nicht mehr wegzudenken. Auch für Johann Büsen, der in diesem digitalen Zeitalter aufwuchs, sind nicht mehr Farbe und Pinsel das zentrale künstlerische Zubehör, sondern Computer, Maus, Grafiktablett und Scanner, weshalb man hier von computergenerierter Kunst spricht. Er vereint darin Elemente aus Comic, Pop Art und Street Art mit unzähligen bearbeiteten Fotografien und Abbildungen zu einem Konglomerat aus dynamischen Strukturen und kontrolliert- konsequentem Chaos, welche geradezu in faszinierenden malerischen Grenzerfahrungen münden.
Kunstförderverein Weinheim e.V.Bismarckstraße 169469 WeinheimÖffnungszeiten Mo-Fr 9-16 Uhr, Do 9-18 Uhrwww.kunstfoerderverein.de
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skiphursh:

Skip Dolphin Hurshwww.skiphursh.com
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fecalface:

LONDON —- tired of walking down the street and having visuals pushed up in your face? Well, Guus Ter Beek and Tayfun Serier in London are out there busy with Photoshop erasing as much as possible with Street Eraser!
Anyone who’s used the software will recognise the grey and white checkerboard pattern, and we rather like the idea that it’s hiding under the surface of everything around us. And there’s still a lot to erase in London. PICS
fecalface:

LONDON —- tired of walking down the street and having visuals pushed up in your face? Well, Guus Ter Beek and Tayfun Serier in London are out there busy with Photoshop erasing as much as possible with Street Eraser!
Anyone who’s used the software will recognise the grey and white checkerboard pattern, and we rather like the idea that it’s hiding under the surface of everything around us. And there’s still a lot to erase in London. PICS
fecalface:

LONDON —- tired of walking down the street and having visuals pushed up in your face? Well, Guus Ter Beek and Tayfun Serier in London are out there busy with Photoshop erasing as much as possible with Street Eraser!
Anyone who’s used the software will recognise the grey and white checkerboard pattern, and we rather like the idea that it’s hiding under the surface of everything around us. And there’s still a lot to erase in London. PICS
fecalface:

LONDON —- tired of walking down the street and having visuals pushed up in your face? Well, Guus Ter Beek and Tayfun Serier in London are out there busy with Photoshop erasing as much as possible with Street Eraser!
Anyone who’s used the software will recognise the grey and white checkerboard pattern, and we rather like the idea that it’s hiding under the surface of everything around us. And there’s still a lot to erase in London. PICS
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